Friday Finds - Developing Leaders & the Monday Blues

  Photo by Luis Llerena via Unsplash

Photo by Luis Llerena via Unsplash

This is the end of a long, but fulfilling week. I had the chance to head home this past weekend to Granger, Indiana, where I'm offering some brainpower to help a friend start a church. And then I was off to Seattle to work with a church solving staffing challenges.

Here are a few articles we've gathered to help you lead smarter this week. Let me know your thoughts in the comment section below. 

5 Ways Highly-Effective People Overcome The Monday Blues by William Vanderbloemen via Forbes

Even the world's most influential leaders struggle with the Monday blues from time to time. My friend and colleague William Vanderbloemen writes a great piece on how to stay productive and alert as we begin each week.  

A Word About Polite Abusers via Pastor Dave Online

Not all abuse is obvious to the casual observer. Sometimes, the most hurtful abuse happens over time in our behavior with those closest to us. Pastor Dave writes a powerful piece on how both church leaders and lay leaders should be vigilant in fighting abuse, no matter what form it takes. 

7 Signs Your Church Staff Will Never Change via Carey Nieuwhof

Has your church staff been feeling in a mid-summer rut? Or are there staff transitions that need to be made, but you don't know where to start? A changing church is a healthy church, and Carey Nieuwhof explains why churches should always be looking ahead rather than staying dormant. 

The Most Effective Way To Develop Leaders with Nicole Unice via Vanderbloemen Search Group

In this week's episode of the Vanderbloemen Leadership Podcast, Nicole Unice gives her unique insight into the process of developing leaders within the church. Whether through internships, apprenticeships or residencies, churches have the ability to create future leaders that impact the Kingdom.

What articles have you read this week that have inspired you to be a better leader? Share them with me in the comments below.

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